Applications, Resubmissions, and the Relative Citation Ratio

Applications, Resubmissions, and the Relative Citation Ratio

Posted on April 25, 2017 by Mike Lauer

Measuring the impact of NIH grants is an important input in our stewardship of research funding. One metric we can use to look at impact, discussed previously on this blog, is the relative citation ratio (or RCR). This measure – which NIH has made freely available through the iCite tool – aims to go further than just raw numbers of published research findings or citations, by quantifying the impact and influence of a research article both within the context of its research field and benchmarked against publications resulting from NIH R01 awards.

In light of our more recent posts on applications and resubmissions, we’d like to go a step further by looking at long-term bibliometric outcomes as a function of submission number. In other words, are there any observable trends in the impact of publications resulting from an NIH grant funded as an A0, versus those funded as an A1 or A2? And does that answer change when we take into account how much funding each grant received? …. Continue reading →

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One Response to Applications, Resubmissions, and the Relative Citation Ratio

  1. JohnBrian says:

    Interesting…
    “We see no evidence of improvements in bibliometric productivity among grants that were awarded after resubmission; if anything, there’s a modest gradient of higher productivity for grants that were funded on the first try.”

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