Partnership formed between @LANDDNET and @RGVPorg

Rio Grande Valley Partners, 501.c.3 non-profit, is now partnering with @Landdnet to provide our clients with a full service approach to grantmaking.

Rio Grande Valley Partners can be found at http://www.RGVP.org and on Twitter @RGVPorg

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ISLPMC Historic Preservation Award International Society for Landscape, Place, & Material Culture (ISLPMC)

Sponsor Website http://www.pioneeramerica.org/index.html
Program URL http://www.pioneeramerica.org/awardhistoric.html
Deadline Dates (ALL) 01-Aug-2016
Synopsis The International Society for Landscape, Place, & Material Culture annually recognizes the preservation, interpretation, instruction, celebration, or exhibition of American material culture.
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More news from SBIR Insider

Where We Go From Here and an Interesting DoD Twist

As for SBIR reauthorization in the 114th congress, nobody has worked harder than Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH).  As ranking member of the SBE, Shaheen was able to author/sponsor a good SBIR reauthorization bill and get bipartisan consensus.  Now the twist: Included in that bill (S.2812), is a provision to make SBIR/STTR permanent!  No more dreaded reauthorizations if it passes!  SBE Committee chair, David Vitter (R-LA) cosponsored this Shaheen/Vitter bill and it passed out of committee.

However, the only hope most insiders see for this year is to have the Shaheen/Vitter SBIR Reauthorization bill (S.2812) inserted into the Senate’s version of the 2017 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).  The Senate NDAA has passed the SASC and will go to the floor of the Senate for discussion, amendments and votes starting Wednesday, May 25.  Amendments will be offered and language changed, which could go on for several days.  In the midst of this, congress will break for the memorial day weekend, then return to wrap up their NDAA.  Time is short but there is a possible narrow window of opportunity!

There are people in the Senate ready to try and insert the SBIR language from the Shaheen/Vitter bill into the NDAA BUT they are being blocked by pressure from the UEs lobbyists.  How effective are these university lobbying groups?  According to an article in the Wall Street Journal: Colleges and universities have become one of the most effective lobbying forces in Washington, employing more lobbyists last year than any other industries except drug manufacturing and technology.  In 2015, these “University Elites” controlled more than $77 million given to more than 1,100 lobbyists.

The small business community can’t match the UEs lobbying money nor the prestige of the elected official hobnobbing with the president of the university (who generally makes far more money than the president of the United States).

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From the SBIR Insider

SBIR Reauthorization This Year? The University Elites (UEs) Say NO!

This being an election year, and a crazy one at that, there are perilously few legislative days left to get SBIR/STTR reauthorized this year.  For the last two decades the SBIR reauthorization process would entail the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship (SBE) to work with the Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC), to insert SBIR reauthorization language into the Senate version of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).  On the House side, the House Small Business Committee (HSBC) would do the same with the House Armed Services Committee (HASC).  Oh yes, I left out the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology (HSST), who usually played the role of SBIR obstructionist since they were pretty much controlled by the UEs, and generally frowned on the SBIR program (actually from its inception).

In spite of the fact that the SBE and HSBC both worked hard in bipartisan efforts for their own SBIR Reauthorization Bills (S.2812 and H.R. 4783 respectively), the University lobbyists were (and still are) busy exercising great power and influence to block efforts to insert this SBIR reauthorization language into the NDAA.

At this point, the train has left the station in the House because they have now passed their NDAA (H.R. 4909) void of any SBIR reauthorization language.  This was largely because the UEs had their lobbyists and HSST committee chair press against insertion.  The UEs and the HSST are demanding the process of “Regular Order”. As part of Regular Order, the HSST states they want to hold three hearings on SBIR in the future, preferably the distant future, then run the SBIR reauthorization process in “Regular Order”. That would put SBIR into the next congress where the UEs could eliminate or drastically reduce the SBIR program.

Let’s discuss Regular Order.  That was the way congress used to work back when we had elected officials who did their job!  For example, every year 12 appropriation bills needed to be passed to run the country.  If we look at the past 5 years, (which would be 12 appropriation bills per year times 5 years) we have 60 appropriation bills that needed to be passed.  You know how many they did pass?  ONE!  Do you know how many SBIR reauthorizations in the whole life of the program passed under Regular Order? ZERO!  Don’t think the UEs and HSST don’t know that!

www.zyn.com/sbir

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Behavioral and Social Science Research on Understanding and Reducing Health Disparities (R21) Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research

Program URL http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-13-288.html
Deadline Dates (ALL) 16-Jun-2016, 07-Sep-2016
Synopsis NIH participating Institutes and Centers invite applications for behavioral and social science research on the causes and solutions to health and disabilities disparities in the U. S. population. Health disparities between, on the one hand, racial/ethnic populations, lower socioeconomic classes, and rural residents and, on the other hand, the overall U.S. population are major public health concerns. Emphasis is placed on research in and among three broad areas of action: 1) public policy, 2) health care, and 3) disease/disability prevention. Particular attention is given to reducing “health gaps” among groups. Applications that utilize an interdisciplinary approach, investigate multiple levels of analysis, incorporate a life-course perspective, and/or employ innovative methods such as systems science or community-based participatory research are particularly encouraged. This program will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism.
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Serious Adverse Drug Reaction Research (R01) National Human Genome Research Institute/NIH/DHHS

Program URL http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-275.html
Deadline Dates (ALL) 04-Oct-2016, 07-Jan-2017, 01-Feb-2017, 07-May-2017, 01-Jun-2017, 07-Sep-2017, 02-Oct-2017, 07-Jan-2018, 01-Feb-2018, 07-May-2018, 01-Jun-2018, 07-Sep-2018, 01-Oct-2018, 07-Jan-2019, 01-Feb-2019, 07-May-2019, 03-Jun-2019, 07-Sep-2019
Synopsis SYNOPSIS:

National Institutes of Health (NIH) and its participating Institutes and Centers invite applications for research grants that will advance the state of knowledge of serious adverse drug reactions. Applications across the spectrum of research are encouraged. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

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Arts-Based Approaches in Palliative Care for Symptom Management (R01) National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health/NIH/DHHS

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Program URL http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-14-294.html
Deadline Dates (ALL) 05-Jun-2016, 07-Sep-2016, 05-Oct-2016, 07-Jan-2017, 05-Feb-2017, 07-May-2017, 05-Jun-2017, 07-Sep-2017
Synopsis SYNOPSIS:

National Institutes of Health (NIH) and its participating Institutes and Centers invite applications for mechanistic clinical studies aimed at understanding the impact of arts-based approaches in palliative care for symptom management. This FOA is intended to support mechanistic clinical studies to provide an evidence base for the use of the arts in palliative care for symptom management. The objective is to understand the biological, physiological, neurological, psychological, and/or sociological mechanisms by which the arts exert their effects on symptom management during and throughout the palliative care continuum. The goal is for the research supported under this FOA to develop an evidence-base that could be used as a basis for the uptake of arts-based therapies in palliative care settings, among individuals across the lifespan, with a wide variety of serious chronic conditions and their accompanying symptoms. This FOA is not intended to determine efficacy or the comparative effectiveness of interventions, or to assess interventions designed to treat the underlying cause of a particular disease state. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project (R01) award mechanism.

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